USER INTERFACE STRATEGIES '92



A Live Satellite TV Broadcast December 12, 1991


University of Maryland Instructional Television


Organized by Ben Shneiderman



Speakers:


Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland

  User Interfaces for Information Visualization



Thomas K. Landauer, Bellcore

  Helping people get more information out of text



Brad A. Myers, Carnegie Mellon University

  Extending direct manipulation:
    Demonstrational interfaces and User Interface Development Environments



Brenda Laurel, Telepresence Research

  Be There Here:  An Introduction to Telepresence



Audience: User interface designers, programmers, software engineers, 
interface evaluators, managers in the computing and communications fields, 
technical writers, human factors specialists, trainers, marketing personnel.


Overview: Four leaders in the field offer their perspectives on why the user 
interface is a central focus for expanding applications of computers in 
business, education, the home, etc.  They offer their visions and suggest 
exciting opportunities for the next decade's developments.  Demonstrations, 
new software tools, guiding principles, emerging theories, and future 
scenarios will be presented.


Enrollment:  This live satellite course will be broadcast from the University 
of Maryland Instructional Television System via Ku and C Bands.  In order 
to view the broadcast, access to a satellite dish is necessary.  Contact your 
organization's training or conference director to ask if he or she can 
organize a satellite downlink and obtain a site license.


If you do not have access to a satellite dish, a number of open viewing sites 
have been established in major metropolitan areas in the US and Canada.  
Cost to view this symposium is $160 per person for 1 to 9 persons or
$1,600 site license for groups of 10 or more.


For information on viewing locations and for questions about the
broadcast, call (301) 405-4905 or FAX (301) 314-9639.  The broadcast 
will be in cooperation with the National Technological University (NTU).






Lecture 1: 11:00am - Noon EST

Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland

  User Interfaces for Information Visualization


The next generation of database management, directory browsing, 
information retrieval, hypermedia, scientific data management, and library 
systems can enable convenient use of larger data sets by a wider range of 
users.  User interface designers can provide more powerful search 
techniques, more comprehensible query facilities, better presentation 
methods, and smoother integration of technology with task.  Novel 
graphical and direct manipulation approaches to query formulation and 
information presentation/manipulation will be shown.  These approaches 
include a filter/flow metaphor for boolean expressions, dynamic query 
methods with continuous visual presentation of results as the query is 
changed (possibly employing parallel computation), and color-coded 2-D 
space-filling tree-maps to show multiple-level hierarchies in a single display 
(hundreds of directories and more than a thousand files can be seen at 
once).


Ben Shneiderman is Head of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory,
Professor of Computer Science, and Member of the Systems Research Center
all at the University of Maryland, College Park.  He is the author of
Designing the User Interface and Software Psychology, and the co-author of
the hyperbook/disk Hypertext Hands-On!.  Dr. Shneiderman is editor of the
Ablex Publishers series on Human-Computer Interaction, on the editorial
board of 6 journals, the author of 130 technical papers, and the creator of
the Hyperties hypertext system.  He is an international lecturer and
consultant for many organizations including Apple, AT&T, IBM, Library of
Congress, NASA, and NCR.                



Lecture 2: 12:30pm - 1:25pm EST

Thomas K. Landauer, Bellcore

  Helping people get more information out of text


The Cognitive Science Research Group at Bellcore has spent a decade
investigating why people find it hard to access textual information, and
trying out new ways to help them.  The research focuses on the fundamental
problems in information retrieval:  the difficulty of asking the right
question when you don't already know the answer, of finding the same words
as authors have used, of finding your way in a maze of information.  New and
proven tools have emerged for indexing, navigation and display of text.
Among them are Unlimited Aliasing, Adaptive Indexing, Fisheye Viewers,
Latent Semantic Indexing, the SuperBook(TM) text browser, all ways to
harness computation in support of human intelligence.

An important foundation of the success of this work has been the 
observation and analysis of people using textual information, with and
without various computer aids.  "Formative design evaluation", in which the
details of what helps and hinders in a new design is used to drive the next
design, has resulted in some of the few systems ever demonstrated to
actually improve on the utility of previous techniques (like paper books and
libraries!).


Tom Landauer is manager of the Cognitive Science Research Group, a part of
the Computer Science Research Division, at Bell Communications Research
(Bellcore), the science and engineering organization jointly owned by the
regional Bell telephone companies.  Tom holds a Ph.D.  in psychology from
Harvard, and taught psychology at Dartmouth College and Stanford University
before joining Bell Labs in 1969.  In 1979 he organized a group to study
human-computer interaction, and moved this group to Bellcore when AT&T
split.  Landauer is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement
of Science and the American Psychological Association.  He is a former
member of the National Research Council Committee on Human Factors, and a
member of several editorial boards.  He has published two books and over 100
scientific papers.



Lecture 3:  1:35pm - 2:30pm EST

Brad A. Myers, Carnegie Mellon University

  Extending direct manipulation:
    Demonstrational interfaces and User Interface Development Environments


Direct manipulation interfaces, in which objects on the screen can be 
pointed to and manipulated using a mouse and keyboard, are now widely 
accepted.  However, some critics point to limitations such as the difficulty 
of providing abstract commands and the lack of programmability.  
Demonstrational interfaces can overcome these problems while still 
providing the benefits of direct manipulation.  A ``demonstrational 
interface'' watches while the user executes conventional direct manipulation 
actions, but creates a more general abstraction from the specific example.  
For instance, the user might drag a file named "v1.ps" to the trash can, and 
then a file named "v2.ps", and a demonstrational interface might 
automatically create a macro to delete all files that end in ".ps".  Modern 
systems increasingly contain demonstrational features, including the way 
that the Macintosh MacDraw "Duplicate" command and the Microsoft Word 
"Renumber" command work.  

The first part of this talk defines demonstrational interfaces, shows a
number of examples, and discusses how this exciting technology can be
applied in novel systems.  The second part of the talk discusses current
directions in tools for helping build user interface software, including how
demonstrational techniques are beginning to be extensively used.



Brad Myers is a Research Computer Scientist at Carnegie Mellon 
University.  He is the principal investigator of the Demonstrational 
Interfaces Project, funded by NSF, Apple and Siemens.  From 1980 until 
1983, he worked at PERQ Systems Corporation where he developed one of 
the first commercial window managers.  Myers received a PhD in computer 
science at the University of Toronto where he developed the Peridot UIMS.  
He received the MS and BSc degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, while a research intern at Xerox PARC.  Myers is the author of 
Creating User Interfaces by Demonstration and over 35 journal and 
conference papers about user interface topics.  He is an associate editor for 
ACM Transactions on Information Systems, The Journal of Visual 
Languages and Computing, and a member of the editorial board of Human-
Computer Interaction.  He is on the program committees of four annual 
conferences.




Lecture 4: 3:00pm - 3:55pm EST

Brenda Laurel, Telepresence Research

  Be There Here:  An Introduction to Telepresence


Telepresence is the term used to describe technology that enables users to
feel as if they are actually present in a different place or time.  'Virtual
realitvy' and 'artificial reality' are popular names for this technology.
Today, the most common form of telepresence involves head-mounted
stereoscopic displays, three-dimensional audio environments, and
instrumented gloves.  Telepresence technology can provide the experience of
being in two different kinds of spaces:  computer-generated worlds or
virtual environments, and actual environments that are physically distant,
hazardous, or inaccessible.  The lecture outline is:


1.  Overview and evolution of telepresence

2.  Description of current telepresence technology

3.  Future technology issues and challenges

4.  Discussion of current and future applications of telepresence in such

    areas as entertainment, education and training, and information

    management


Brenda Laurel has worked in the personal computer industry since 1976 a 
programmer, software designer, marketeer, producer, and researcher.  She 
has consulted in interactive entertainment and human-computer interface 
design for Apple, Atari, Lucasfilm, and the School of Computer Science at 
Carnegie Mellon University.  In 1990, she joined Scott Fisher in founding 
Telepresence Research, a new company to conduct research and 
development in telepresence technology and applications.  Brenda has 
published extensively on such subjects as virtual reality design, computer-
based agents, and interactive fiction.  She is editor of the book, The Art of 
Human-Computer Interface Design [Addison-Wesley, 1990] and author of 
Computers as Theatre [Addison-Wesley, 1991].  Her PhD is from Ohio 
State University in 1986.



Discussion: 4:05pm - 5:00pm EST

Phoned-in and faxed questions will be discussed live by the four speakers.