Jaime Montemayor
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
11100 Johns Hopkins Road
Laurel, MD 20723

 
If you have trouble downloading a paper or need it in another format, don't hesitate to contact me [myfirstname dot mylastname at jhuapl dot edu].
Refereed Papers
An Interactive Visualization System for Analyzing Spacecraft Telemetry
Authors:
George Cancro, Russell Turner, Lilian Nguyen, Angela Li, Deane Sibol, John Gersh, Christine Piatko, Jaime Montemayor, and Priscilla McKerracher.

Citation:
Cancro, G., Turner, R., Nguyen, L., Li, A., Sibol, D., Gersh, J., Piatko, C., Montemayor, J., and McKerracher, P. (2007) An Interactive Visualization System for Analyzing Spacecraft Telemetry. In IEEE Aerospace, March 2007.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
Traditionally, the diagnosis of spacecraft anomalies during test and flight is slow and not very thorough due to a limited view of telemetry. The process is an off-line, linear analysis of guessing a root cause and then attempting to verify the guess through identifying and plotting telemetry channels over the appropriate time period. The desire of mission operators and testers is to have a capability to analyze all telemetry channels simultaneously and then be able to freely move through time to cover the entire problem space. Current telemetry display systems, however, only allow an operator to examine on the order of 100 telemetry channels simultaneously from a real-time stream, through a rudimentary playback, or step control of a telemetry archive. This limitation increases the risk that anomalies will be missed and increases the time to determine the real root-cause of the problem. This paper discusses the development and implementation of a visualization system that facilitates a thorough review by enabling an operator to analyze all telemetry data by pattern. This system, called the STEREO Autonomy Visualizer (SAV) also enables the rapid review of data by using a ‘real-time random access’ method for viewing real-time and archive telemetry streams. By using the system, STEREO testers have identified bugs that other test review techniques have missed, and decreased the time necessary to perform test review by more than a factor of 5. In addition, use of this system has resulted in a greater understanding of the spacecraft through the visualization of inter-relationships between telemetry channels during faults in flight.
A Theoretical Model of Children's Storytelling using Physically-Oriented Technologies (SPOT)
Authors:
Mona Leigh Guha, Allison Druin, Jaime Montemayor, Gene Chipman, and Allison Farber.

Citation:
Guha, M. L., Druin, A., Montemayor, J., Chipman, G., and Farber, A. (2006) A Theoretical Model of Children's Storytelling using Physically-Oriented Technologies (SPOT). In the Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Volume 16, Number 4.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
This paper develops a model of children's storytelling using Physically-Oriented Technology (SPOT). The SPOT model draws upon literature regarding current physical storytelling technologies and was developed using a grounded theory approach to qualitative research. This empirical work focused on the experiences of 18 children, ages 5-6, who worked with an existing multimedia physical storytelling technology in order to tell stories. Pairs of children worked over five weeks to tell stories using StoryRooms, a physical storytelling technology developed at the University of Maryland's Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL). The SPOT model suggests that the each unique child and context together determine the best degree of control over the technology, the degree of control over story content, and the physical activity for each situation. Together, these characteristics of technology, story content, and physical activity produce a unique storytelling experience. The SPOT theoretical model provides a basis to propose technology design guidelines that will support the creation of new multimedia physical storytelling technologies.
Supporting Insight-based Information Exploration in Intelligence Analysis
Authors:
John Gersh, Bessie Lewis, Jaime Montemayor, Christine Piatko, and Russell Turner.

Citation:
Gersh, J., Lewis, B., Montemayor, J., Piatko, C., and Turner, R. (2006) Supporting Insight-based Information Exploration in Intelligence Analysis. In Communications of ACM, April 2006.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
We are interested in the role of exploratory search in the intelligence analysis process, especially its role in sensemaking: how can exploring a set of information help an analyst to synthesize, understand, and present a coherent explanation of what it tells us about the world?


ACM Digital Library
Tools for Children to Create Physical Interactive StoryRooms
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Allison Druin, Gene Chipman, Allison Farber, Mona Leigh Guha.

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., Chipman, G., Farber, A., and Guha,. M. L. (2004) Tools for Children to Create Physical Interactive StoryRooms. In Computers in Entertainment, Volume 2, Issue 1.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
Over the past few years, researchers have been exploring possibilities for ways in which embedded technologies can enrich children's storytelling experiences. In this article we present our research on physical interactive storytelling environments from a child's perspective. We present the system architecture as well as a formative study of the technology's use with 18 children, ages 5-6. We discuss the challenges and opportunities for kindergarten children to become creators of their own physical storytelling interactions.

Note: This paper is available on the ACM Portal. Just search with the paper title.

Physical programming: tools for kindergarten children to author physical interactive environments
Author:
Jaime Montemayor

Citation:
Montemayor, J. (2003). Physical programming: tools for kindergarten children to author physical interactive environments. Doctoral dissertation, department of computer science, University of Maryland.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
StoryRooms is a child-centered ubiquitous computing environment (ubicomp) developed for young children to expresses stories. Physical programming is a set of tangible tools and user interaction metaphors for children to control the behaviors of embedded objects in StoryRooms. In this dissertation I describe StoryRooms and physical programming, along with the two studies which showed that kindergarten students had the capacity to understand and use the physical programming approach to control the specialized StoryRooms.

Dissertation (PDF)

Physical programming: Designing tools for children to create physical interactive environments
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Allison Druin, Allison Farber, Sante Simms, Wayne Churaman, Allison D'Amour

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., Farber, A., Simms, S., Churaman, W., and D'Amour, A. (2002). Physical programming: Designing tools for children to create physical interactive environments. In Proceedings of Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM Press.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
Physical interactive environments can come in many forms: museum installations, amusement parks, experimental theaters, and more. Programming these environments has historically been done by adults, and children, as the visiting participants, have been offered few pre-created choices to explore. Given these creative limitations, the goal of our research has been to develop programming tools for physical interactive environments that are appropriate for use by young children (ages 4-6). We have explored numerous design approaches over the past two years. Recently we began focusing on a "physical programming" approach and developed a wizard-of-oz prototype for young children. This paper presents the motivation for this research, the evolution of our programming approach, and our recent explorations with children.

ACM Digital Library

Physical Programming: Software You Can Touch
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor

Citation:
Montemayor, J. (2001) Physical Programming: Software You Can Touch. In Extended Abstracts, Doctoral Consortium, CHI2001.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
Tangible computer-human interfaces is an important and active research area. But, few people are working on ways to easily program these systems. My work addresses this need by developing a physical programming language. This research comes out of our work in developing tools for children to build room-sized storytelling environments. In this extended abstract, I will describe the motivation for my research, my proposed work and design methods.
StoryKit: Tools for Children to build room-sized interactive experiences
Authors:
Lisa Sherman, Allison Druin, Jaime Montemayor, Allison Farber, Michele Platner, Sante Simms, Jessica Porteous, Houman Alborzi, Jack Best, Joe Hammer, Alex Kruskal, Jade Matthews, Emily Rhodes, Cassandra Cosans, Abby Lal

Citation:
Sherman, L., Druin, A., Montemayor, J., Farber, A., Platner, M., Simms, S., Porteous, J., Alborzi, H., Best, J., Hammer, J., Kruskal, A., Matthews, J., Rhodes, E., Cosans, C., Lal, L. (2001) StoryKit: Tools for Children to build room-sized interactive experiences. In Extended Abstracts, Interactive Video Poster, CHI2001.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
Children enjoy interactive museum experiences, fun houses, and amusement parks, but children are not the authors of these immersive storytelling experiences. They are merely the audience or participants in an environment built by adults. We believe an important educational opportunity is being overlooked. Therefore, we have developed what we call a StoryKit that enables children to be authors, builders, and artists of their own StoryRooms, room-sized immersive experiences. Funware, hardware, and physical software are the three components that make up the StoryKit. In this paper and accompanying video, we describe the StoryKit technologies, our most recent advances in the technology, and how children create a StoryRoom by using the StoryKit.
Therapeutic Play with a Storytelling Robot
Authors:
Corinna Lathan, Jack Maxwell Vice, Michael Tracey,Catherine Plaisant, Allison Druin, Kris Edward, Jaime Montemayor

Citation:
Lathan, C., Vice, J. M., Tracey, M., Plaisant, C., Druin, A., Edward, K., & Montemayor, J. (2001) Therapeutic Play with a Storytelling Robot. In Demonstration, CHI2001.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
We are developing a prototype storytelling robot for use with children in rehabilitation. Children can remotely control a furry robot by using a variety of body sensors adapted to their disability or rehabilitation goal. We believe this robot can motivate children and help them reach their therapy goals through therapeutic play, either by exercising muscles or joints (e.g. for physically challenged children) or by reflecting on the stories (e.g. for children with developmental disabilities). To develop this technology we use an innovative design methodology involving children as design partners.
A Storytelling Robot for Pediatric Rehabilitation
Authors:
Catherine Plaisant, Allison Druin, Corinna Lathan, Kapil Dakhane, Kris Edwards, Jack Maxwell Vice, and Jaime Montemayor

Citation:
Plaisant, C., Druin, A., Lathan, C., Dakhane, K., Edwards, K., Vice J. M. and Montemayor, J. (2000) A Storytelling Robot for Pediatric Rehabilitation, to appear in the Proceedings of ASSETS'2000, Washington DC, Nov. 2000, ACM, New York.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
We are developing a prototype storytelling robot for use with children in rehabilitation. Children can remotely control a large furry robot by using a variety of body sensors adapted to their disability or rehabilitation goal. In doing so, they can teach the robot to act out emotions (e.g. sad, happy, excited) and then write stories using the storytelling software and include those emotions in the story. The story can then be "played" by the remote controlled robot, which acts out the story and the emotions. We believe that this robot can motivate the children and help them reach their therapy goals through therapeutic play, either by exercising muscles or joints (e.g. for physically challenges children) or by reflecting on the expression of emotions (e.g. for autistic children). We use an innovative design methodology involving children as design partners.

ACM Digital Library
Designing StoryRooms: Interactive Storytelling Spaces for Children
Authors:
Houman Alborzi, Allison Druin, Jaime Montemayor, Michele Platner, Jessica Porteous, Lisa Sherman, Angela Boltman, Gustav Tax»n, Jack Best, Joe Hammer, Alex Kruskal, Abby Lal, Thomas Plaisant Schwenn, Lauren Sumida, Rebecca Wagner, & Jim Hendler

Citation:
Alborzi, H., Druin, A., Montemayor, J., Platner, M., Porteous, J., Sherman, L., Boltman, A., Tax»n, G., Best, J., Hammer, J., Kruskal, A., Lal, A., Plaisant-Schwenn, T., Sumida, L., Wagner, R., Hendler, J. (2000) Designing StoryRooms: Interactive Storytelling Spaces for Children. In Designing Interactive Systems (DIS-2000).

Abstract/First Paragraph:
Costly props, complicated authoring technologies, and limited access to space are among the many reasons why children can rarely enjoy the experience of authoring room-sized interactive stories. Typically in these kinds of environments, children are restricted to being story participants, rather than story authors. Therefore, we have begun the development of "StoryRooms," room-sized immersive storytelling experiences for children. With the use of low-tech and high-tech storytelling elements, children can author physical storytelling experiences to share with other children. In the paper that follows, we will describe our design philosophy, design process with children, the current technology implementation and example StoryRooms.

ACM Digital Library
From PETS to Storykit: Creating New Technology With An Intergenerational Design Team
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Houman Alborzi, Allison Druin, Jim Hendler, Deborah Pollack, Jessica Porteous, Lisa Sherman, Asmara Afework, Jack Best, Joe Hammer, Alexander Kruskal, Abigail Lal, Thomas Plaisant Schwenn, Lauren Sumida, & Rebecca Wagner

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Alborzi, H., Druin, A., Hendler, J., Pollack, D., Porteous, J., Sherman, L., Afework, A., Best, J., Hammer, J., Kruskal, A., Lal, A., Plaisant- Schwenn, T., Sumida, L., & Wagner, R. (2000) From PETS to Storykit: Creating New Technology With An Intergenerational Design Team. In Workshop on Interactive Robotics and Entertainment (WIRE-2000), Pittsburgh, April 2000.

Note:
A better written version is here.
Designing PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories.
Authors:
Druin, A., Montemayor, J., Hendler, J., McAlister, B., Boltman, A., Fiterman, E., Plaisant, A., Kruskal, A., Olsen, H., Revett, I., Plaisant- Schwenn, T., Sumida, L., & Wagner, R.

Formats:
HTML (.html) [Note: this document was directly translated from Word into HTML.]
Postscript (.ps)

Citation:
Druin, A., Montemayor, J., Hendler, J., McAlister, B., Boltman, A., Fiterman, E., Plaisant, A., Kruskal, A., Olsen, H., Revett, I., Plaisant- Schwenn, T., Sumida, L., & Wagner, R. (1999) Desiging PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories. In Proceedings of CHI99, ACM Press.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
We have begun the development of a new robotic pet that can support children in the storytelling process. Children can build their own pet by snapping together the modular animal parts of the PETS robot. After their pet is built, children can tell stories using the My Pets software. These stories can then be acted out by their robotic pet. This video paper describes the motivation for this research and the design process of our intergenerational design team in building the first PETS prototypes. We will discuss our progress to date and our focus for the future.
Book Chapters
From PETS to StoryRooms, Constructive Storytelling Systems Designed with Children, for Children
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Allison Druin, and James Hendler

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., and Hendler, J. From PETS to storyrooms: constructive storytelling systems designed with children, for children. In Socially Intelligent Agents - creating relationships with computers and robots, K. Dautenhahn, A. Bond, L. Canamero, and B. Edmonds, Eds. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002.

Abstract/First Paragraph:
Working with children as our design partners, our intergenerational design team at the University of Maryland has been developing both new design methodologies and new storytelling technology for children. In this chapter, we focus on two results of our efforts: PETS, a robotic storyteller, and Storykit, a construction kit of low-tech and high-tech components for children to build physical interactive storytelling environments.
PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories.
Authors:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., and Hendler, J.

Note:
This is the book chapter version of this tech report.

Symposia, Workshops, Tutorials, and Technical Reports
SocialRank: An Ego- and Time-centric Workflow for Relationship Identification
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Chris Diehl, Mike Pekala, and David Patrone.

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Diehl, C., Pekala, M., and Patrone, D. (2008) Interactive Poster - SocialRank: An Ego- and Time-centric Workflow for Relationship Identification. In VAST Posters, October 2008.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
From instant messaging and email to wikis and blogs, millions of individuals are generating content that reflects their relationships with others in the world, both online and offline. Since communication artifacts are recordings of life events, we can gain insights into the social attributes and structures of the people within this communication history. In this paper, we describe SocialRank, an ego- and time-centric workflow for identifying social relationships in an email corpus. This workflow includes four high-level tasks: discovery, validation, annotation and dissemination. SocialRank combines relationship ranking algorithms with timeline, social network diagram, and multidimensional scaling visualization techniques to support these tasks.

Information Visualization for Rule-based Resource Access Control
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Andrew Freeman, John Gersh, Thomas Llanso, Dennis Patrone.

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Freeman, A., Gersh, J., Llanso, T., and Patrone, D. (2006) Information Visualization for Rule-based Resource Access Control. In the Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS).
Abstract/First Paragraph:
A conventional approach to protecting sensitive information is to use different and unconnected physical networks. However, physical separation complicates data sharing and information fusion. Recently researchers have begun to introduce ways to reunify disparate systems while providing sophisticated access control mechanisms, for example through rules. Rules offer flexibility and protection at varying levels of control granularity, but the resulting complexity can quickly overwhelm the resource access control administrator. In this paper we suggest various information visualization techniques that may help the administrator more quickly to gain situational awareness of interactions among the access control rules.

"And You Did That Why?" - Using an Abstraction Hierarchy to Design Interaction with Autonomous Spacecraft
Authors:
John Gersh, Kevin Cropper, William Fitzpatrick, Priscilla McKerracher, Jaime Montemayor, and Daniel Ossing.

Citation:
Gersh, J., Cropper, K., Fitzpatrick, W., McKerracher, P., Montemayor, J., and Ossing, D. (2005) "And You Did That Why?" - Using an Abstraction Hierarchy to Design Interaction with Autonomous Spacecraft. In Persistent Assistants: Living and Working with AI: Papers from the 2005 Spring Symposium, ed. Daniel Shapiro, Pauline Berry, John Gersh, Nathan Schurr, pp 22-25. Technical Report SS-05-05. American Association for Artificial Intelligence, Menlo Park, California.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
We are investigating the design of user interaction with autonomous spacecraft in particular, with spacecraft where contact is made only intermittently. Our initial efforts focus on designs supporting existing spacecraft capabilities, where autonomy is reflexive and based on complicated rules. We report here an initial design concept for human interaction based on an abstraction hierarchy, produced by a work domain analysis of the spacecraft's mission. Organizing information depiction, according to the hierarchy's means-ends relationships, among functions and components appears to be a promising approach for providing answers to critical questions posed by operations staff. The staff needs the ability to quickly answer questions on what activities the spacecraft undertook between contacts and why, especially if the activities differ from planned or nominal operations.

Sensing, Storytelling, and Children: Putting Users in Control
Authors:
Jaime Montemayor, Allison Druin, Gene Chipman, Allison Farber, and Mona Leigh Guha.

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., Chipman, G., Farber, A., and Guha,. M. L. (2003) Sensing, storytelling, and children: putting users in control. University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies technical report UMIACS-TR-2003-16.
Abstract/First Paragraph:
n/a

PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories.
Authors:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., and Hendler, J.

Available From:
CS-TR-4074, UMIACS-TR-99-67 [PDF], [HTML]

Note:
Also published in Robots For Kids, Morgan Kaufmann, San Francisco, CA. Druin, A. and Hendler J. (eds.)
An excerpt of this paper also appeared in the i3magazine.

Citation:
Montemayor, J., Druin, A., and Hendler, J. 1999. PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories. Technical Report. Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland at College Park.
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